Posts tagged ‘Traditional Chinese Medicine’

Systems biology

  1. Levo M, Segal E. In pursuit of design principles of regulatory sequences. Nat Rev Genet. 2014 Jul;15(7):453-68. doi: 10.1038/nrg3684. Epub 2014 Jun 10. PubMed PMID: 24913666.
  2. Patel AP, Tirosh I, Trombetta JJ, Shalek AK, Gillespie SM, Wakimoto H, Cahill DP, Nahed BV, Curry WT, Martuza RL, Louis DN, Rozenblatt-Rosen O, Suvà ML, Regev A, Bernstein BE. Single-cell RNA-seq highlights intratumoral heterogeneity in primary glioblastoma. Science. 2014 Jun 20;344(6190):1396-401. doi: 10.1126/science.1254257. Epub 2014 Jun 12. PubMed PMID: 24925914.

Stem cells

  1. Cattaneo E, Corbellini G. Stem cells: taking a stand against pseudoscience. Nature. 2014 Jun 19;509(7505):333-5. PubMed PMID: 24955466.
  2. Bertolotti E, Neri A, Camparini M, Macaluso C, Marigo V. Stem cells as source for retinal pigment epithelium transplantation. Prog Retin Eye Res. 2014 Jun 13. pii: S1350-9462(14)00037-8. doi: 10.1016/j.preteyeres.2014.06.002. [Epub ahead of print] Review. PubMed PMID: 24933042.
  3. Ye L, Wang J, Beyer AI, Teque F, Cradick TJ, Qi Z, Chang JC, Bao G, Muench MO, Yu J, Levy JA, Kan YW. Seamless modification of wild-type induced pluripotent stem cells to the natural CCR5?32 mutation confers resistance to HIV infection. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 Jun 9. pii: 201407473. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 24927590.
  4. Park CY, Kim J, Kweon J, Son JS, Lee JS, Yoo JE, Cho SR, Kim JH, Kim JS, Kim DW. Targeted inversion and reversion of the blood coagulation factor 8 gene in human iPS cells using TALENs. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 Jun 24;111(25):9253-8. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1323941111. Epub 2014 Jun 9. PubMed PMID: 24927536.

Neuroscience

  1. Rose N. The human brain project: social and ethical challenges. Neuron. 2014 Jun 18;82(6):1212-5. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2014.06.001. PubMed PMID: 24945767.
  2. Cohen MA, Konkle T, Rhee JY, Nakayama K, Alvarez GA. Processing multiple visual objects is limited by overlap in neural channels. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 Jun 17;111(24):8955-60. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1317860111. Epub 2014 Jun 2. PubMed PMID: 24889618.
  3. Prevedel R, Yoon YG, Hoffmann M, Pak N, Wetzstein G, Kato S, Schrödel T, Raskar R, Zimmer M, Boyden ES, Vaziri A. Simultaneous whole-animal 3D imaging of neuronal activity using light-field microscopy. Nat Methods. 2014 Jul;11(7):727-30. doi: 10.1038/nmeth.2964. Epub 2014 May 18. PubMed PMID: 24836920.

Neurobehaviour

  1. Pérez-Escudero A, Vicente-Page J, Hinz RC, Arganda S, de Polavieja GG. idTracker: tracking individuals in a group by automatic identification of unmarked animals. Nat Methods. 2014 Jul;11(7):743-8. doi: 10.1038/nmeth.2994. Epub 2014 Jun 1. PubMed PMID: 24880877.

Psychology

  1. Jung K, Shavitt S, Viswanathan M, Hilbe JM. Female hurricanes are deadlier than male hurricanes. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 Jun 17;111(24):8782-7. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1402786111. Epub 2014 Jun 2. PubMed PMID: 24889620.

Retinal Development

  1. Laranjeiro R, Whitmore D. Transcription factors involved in retinogenesis are co-opted by the circadian clock following photoreceptor differentiation. Development. 2014 Jun 12. pii: dev.104380. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 24924194.

Eye diseases

  1. Huber-Reggi SP, Mueller KP, Straumann D, Huang MY, Neuhauss SC. Individual Larvae of the Zebrafish Mutant belladonna Display Multiple Infantile Nystagmus-Like Waveforms that Are Influenced by Viewing Conditions. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2014 May 27;55(6):3971-8. doi: 10.1167/iovs.13-13576. PubMed PMID: 24867578.

Zebrafish

  1. Law SH, Sargent TD. The Serine-Threonine Protein Kinase PAK4 Is Dispensable in Zebrafish: Identification of a Morpholino-Generated Pseudophenotype. PLoS One. 2014 Jun 19;9(6):e100268. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0100268. eCollection 2014. PubMed PMID: 24945275.

Genome editing/medicine

  1. Ye L, Wang J, Beyer AI, Teque F, Cradick TJ, Qi Z, Chang JC, Bao G, Muench MO, Yu J, Levy JA, Kan YW. Seamless modification of wild-type induced pluripotent stem cells to the natural CCR5?32 mutation confers resistance to HIV infection. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 Jun 9. pii: 201407473. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 24927590.
  2. Park CY, Kim J, Kweon J, Son JS, Lee JS, Yoo JE, Cho SR, Kim JH, Kim JS, Kim DW. Targeted inversion and reversion of the blood coagulation factor 8 gene in human iPS cells using TALENs. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2014 Jun 24;111(25):9253-8. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1323941111. Epub 2014 Jun 9. PubMed PMID: 24927536.
  3. Kiani S, Beal J, Ebrahimkhani MR, Huh J, Hall RN, Xie Z, Li Y, Weiss R. CRISPR
    transcriptional repression devices and layered circuits in mammalian cells. Nat
    Methods. 2014 Jul;11(7):723-6. doi: 10.1038/nmeth.2969. Epub 2014 May 5. PubMed
    PMID: 24797424.
  4. Nissim L, Perli SD, Fridkin A, Perez-Pinera P, Lu TK. Multiplexed and Programmable Regulation of Gene Networks with an Integrated RNA and CRISPR/Cas Toolkit in Human Cells. Mol Cell. 2014 May 22;54(4):698-710. doi: 10.1016/j.molcel.2014.04.022. Epub 2014 May 15. PubMed PMID: 24837679.

Drug Discovery

  1. Wang YN, Hou YY, Sun MZ, Zhang CY, Bai G, Zhao X, Feng XZ. Behavioural screening of zebrafish using neuroactive traditional Chinese medicine prescriptions and biological targets. Sci Rep. 2014 Jun 16;4:5311. doi: 10.1038/srep05311. PubMed PMID: 24931174; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4058885.

Science Career

  1. Casadevall A, Fang FC. Causes for the persistence of impact factor mania. MBio. 2014 Mar 18;5(2):e00064-14. doi: 10.1128/mBio.00064-14. PubMed PMID: 24643863; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3967521.

Development

  1. Nicolas M, Hassan BA. Amyloid precursor protein and neural development. Development. 2014 Jul;141(13):2543-8. doi: 10.1242/dev.108712. PubMed PMID: 24961795.
  2. Deneris ES, Hobert O. Maintenance of postmitotic neuronal cell identity. Nat Neurosci. 2014 Jul;17(7):899-907. doi: 10.1038/nn.3731. Epub 2014 Jun 15. PubMed PMID: 24929660.

Methods

  1. Hughes AJ, Spelke DP, Xu Z, Kang CC, Schaffer DV, Herr AE. Single-cell western blotting. Nat Methods. 2014 Jul;11(7):749-55. doi: 10.1038/nmeth.2992. Epub 2014  Jun 1. PubMed PMID: 24880876.

On 6/24-25, I visited Shenyang Eye Research Institute, a growing eye research institute in the Fourth People’s Hospital, Shenyang, China. During my visit, I shared our vision on using zebrafish to screen traditional Chinese medicines for better vision with the local eye doctors and research students. I am very impressed with the dedication of the students and leadership team in establishing a competitive research program. To improve their English skill, they have established a regular English debate on non-scientific subjects! I enjoyed participating in their lively discussion. I look forward to interact more with this enthusiastic group in the future!

With Drs Yang Qu and Shaodan Zhang, and the enthusiastic research students.

Sylvia and Fai attended the 2013 Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology and presented their work on novel signal transduction for photoreceptor development and using traditional Chinese medicine to treat retinal degeneration. Sylvia received a National Eye Institute Travel Grant and Yeunkyung Woo Achieve Excellence Travel Award to attend the meeting. Sylvia and Fai also interacted with colleagues all over the world during different events including the SERI reception, ARVO dinner with The Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical College, and ARVO CUHK-JSIEC Research Networking Evening.

Sylvia and Fai in front of Sylvia’s poster

Picture opportunity with the hosts of ARVO CUHK-JSIEC Research Networking Evening
From Left to Right: Yuk Fai Leung (Purdue), Prof. Mingzhi Zhang (Joint Shantou International Eye Center), and Prof. Calvin Pang (Chinese University of Hong Kong)

We have got an opportunity to share the vision on using zebrafish for screening eye drugs in our JSIEC-Purdue Joint Laboratory with many distinguished guests from all over the world, including Dr. Mansoor Sarfarazi (U Conn), Dr. G Kumaramanickavel (Narayana Nethralaya), Dr. John Prakash (Associate Director, NEI), Dr. Martine Jager (Former ARVO president, Leiden University), Dr. Motokazu Tsujikawa (Osaka), Dr.Vincent Raymond (U Laval) , Dr. Kanxing Zhao (Zhongshan) and many more.

Fai and Sylvia with Dr. Mingzhi Zhang (JSIEC), Dr. Haoyu Chen (JSIEC), Dr. John Prakash (NEI) and Mrs. Prakash.

I visited Ho Yu College in Hong Kong last month. A good mentor Dr. William Mak has been running a great biotechnology education program for the primary and secondary school students, as well as the public there. See an old post about their outreach program in which they fit a whole research lab into custom-built bus! I shared the research program of our laboratory at Purdue University on using zebrafish to screen drugs for vision benefit.

 

I outlined our approach on using simple visual behaviour assays to identify positive effects of drugs. I specifically emphasized on the potential to analyze many of traditional Chinese medicines; the treasure that we have been consuming for generations. Some of these possibilities are outlined in our recent review paper:

Zhang LY, Chong L, Cho J, Liao PC, Shen F, Leung YF. Drug Screening to Treat Early-Onset Eye Diseases: Can Zebrafish Expedite the Discovery? Asia-Pac J Ophthalmol 2012; 1:374-383. [Full text][pdf]

 

The interaction with the students was fantastic. They were very imaginative and eager to ask questions all the time! Their enthusiasm was infectious and is the driving force of scientific progress. That also reminded me of the problem of our education in stifling creativity when students are “educated”, which I wrote in a separate post recently.

This is truly an enjoyable experience and I look forward to visiting them again soon!

On 12th November 2012, Prof. Calvin Chi-Pui Pang from the Chinese University of Hong Kong and Prof. Haoyu Chen from the Joint Shantou International Eye Center (JSIEC), Shantou University & the Chinese University of Hong Kong visited the Leung Lab and the research facilities at Purdue University.

Prof Pang and Chen first met with Prof. Marietta Harrison, Associate Vice-President for Research and Dr. Geanie Umberger, Assistant Vice President for Corporate and Foundation Relations to discuss collaborative plans between the Leung Lab, Purdue and JSIEC. Our long-term goal is to explore the opportunities in clinical eye research and drug screening  in China.

From left to right: Dr. Umberger, Prof. Harrison, Prof. Pang, Prof. Leung, and Prof. Chen.

Then, Profs. Pang and Chen visited the Bindley Bioscience Center. Dr. Tommy Sors, the Center Project Manager, showcased the Purdue’s infrastructure for preclinical investigations.

From left to right: Prof. Chen, Prof. Leung, Prof. Pang and Dr. Sors.

Finally, there was a dinner gathering with Prof. Marietta and other distinguished professors from the Department of Biological Sciences to celebrate friendship and new collaborative relationships.

Back row: Prof. Don Ready, Prof. Chen, Prof. Leung and Dr. Liyun Zhang, postdoctoral fellow in the Leung Lab.
Front row: Prof. Bill Pak, Prof. Marietta, Prof. Pang, and Prof. Richard Kuhn.