Posts tagged ‘cancer research’

Development

  1. Vogel G. Reproductive biology. Potential egg stem cells reignite debate. Science. 2012 Mar 2;335(6072):1029-30. PubMed PMID: 22383817.

Scientific career

  1. Mervis J. Scientific careers. Is motherhood the biggest reason for academia’s gender imbalance? Science. 2012 Mar 2;335(6072):1030-1. PubMed PMID: 22383818.

Genomics

  1. Xu X, Hou Y, Yin X, Bao L, Tang A, Song L, Li F, Tsang S, Wu K, Wu H, He W, Zeng L, Xing M, Wu R, Jiang H, Liu X, Cao D, Guo G, Hu X, Gui Y, Li Z, Xie W, Sun X, Shi M, Cai Z, Wang B, Zhong M, Li J, Lu Z, Gu N, Zhang X, Goodman L, Bolund L, Wang J, Yang H, Kristiansen K, Dean M, Li Y, Wang J. Single-cell exome sequencing reveals single-nucleotide mutation characteristics of a kidney tumor. Cell. 2012 Mar 2;148(5):886-95. PubMed PMID: 22385958.
  2. Hou Y, Song L, Zhu P, Zhang B, Tao Y, Xu X, Li F, Wu K, Liang J, Shao D, Wu H, Ye X, Ye C, Wu R, Jian M, Chen Y, Xie W, Zhang R, Chen L, Liu X, Yao X, Zheng H, Yu C, Li Q, Gong Z, Mao M, Yang X, Yang L, Li J, Wang W, Lu Z, Gu N, Laurie G, Bolund L, Kristiansen K, Wang J, Yang H, Li Y, Zhang X, Wang J. Single-Cell ExomeSequencing and Monoclonal Evolution of a JAK2-Negative Myeloproliferative Neoplasm. Cell. 2012 Mar 2;148(5):873-85. PubMed PMID: 22385957.

Systems biology

  1. Angermann BR, Klauschen F, Garcia AD, Prustel T, Zhang F, Germain RN, Meier-Schellersheim M. Computational modeling of cellular signaling processes embedded into dynamic spatial contexts. Nat Methods. 2012 Jan 29;9(3):283-9. doi: 10.1038/nmeth.1861. PubMed PMID: 22286385.
    • Commentary: Sneddon MW, Emonet T. Modeling cellular signaling: taking space into the computation. Nat Methods. 2012 Feb 28;9(3):239-42. doi: 10.1038/nmeth.1900. PubMed PMID: 22373909.

Imaging

  1. Allan C, Burel JM, Moore J, Blackburn C, Linkert M, Loynton S, Macdonald D, Moore WJ, Neves C, Patterson A, Porter M, Tarkowska A, Loranger B, Avondo J, Lagerstedt I, Lianas L, Leo S, Hands K, Hay RT, Patwardhan A, Best C, Kleywegt GJ, Zanetti G, Swedlow JR. OMERO: flexible, model-driven data management for experimental biology. Nat Methods. 2012 Feb 28;9(3):245-53. doi: 10.1038/nmeth.1896. PubMed PMID: 22373911.
  2. Ragan T, Kadiri LR, Venkataraju KU, Bahlmann K, Sutin J, Taranda J, Arganda-Carreras I, Kim Y, Seung HS, Osten P. Serial two-photon tomography for automated ex vivo mouse brain imaging. Nat Methods. 2012 Jan 15;9(3):255-8. doi:  10.1038/nmeth.1854. PubMed PMID: 22245809; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3297424

Genetics

  1. Wang X, Chen X, Yang Y. Spatiotemporal control of gene expression by a light-switchable transgene system. Nat Methods. 2012 Feb 12;9(3):266-9. doi: 10.1038/nmeth.1892. PubMed PMID: 22327833.

 

Naked mole rat from Wikipedia

The genome sequence of the naked mole rat is published recently (Kim et al., 2011) ! This is an amazing creature that lives almost up to 30 years in captivity, 9 times longer than mice. At the same time they do not seem to suffer from cancer or a decline in fertility (Buffenstein 2008).

I have been fascinated by the research on the naked mole rats since I read an research article published by Vera Gorbunova’s group in 2009 (Seluanov et al., 2009). In this study, the authors elucidated the naturally occurred anti-cancer mechanism inside this creature. As it turns out, the cells from the naked mole rat will initiate a program to turn off cell growth as soon as the cells start touching each other in culture, a much earlier response than that in regular rats or mice. The most impressive finding is that this early program that can turn off cell growth actually uses the same cell division control mechanisms as in us, but it is just fine-tuned to respond to growth more sensitively. In the new study that sequenced the genome of the naked mole rat, a number of interesting findings have been found and may reveal other aspects of its longevity and physiology for this success and etc. I will save this for your own personal reading.

I find all these results beautiful and  powerfully remind us how studying our nature can lead to potentially important findings that can “translate” to human health; and how the “traditional” clinical research on human and classical animal models can miss the answer that is already out there.

Extended readings

  1. Buffenstein R. Negligible senescence in the longest living rodent, the naked mole-rat: insights from a successfully aging species. J Comp Physiol B. 2008 May;178(4):439-45. Epub 2008 Jan 8. Review. PubMed PMID: 18180931.
  2. Kim EB et al., Genome sequencing reveals insights into physiology and longevity of the naked mole rat. Nature. 2011 Oct 12. doi: 10.1038/nature10533. [Epub ahead of print] PubMed PMID: 21993625.
  3. Seluanov A et al., Hypersensitivity to contact inhibition provides a clue to cancer resistance of naked mole-rat. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 Nov 17;106(46):19352-7. Epub 2009 Oct 26. PubMed PMID: 19858485; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC2780760.